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Battery Cell Bonding Applications

The bonding of individual battery cells in to a larger battery module

Battery cells are manufactured in many sizes to fit the end product. The most common shapes are cylindrical, and rectangular. While the use of either shape is dependent on the battery pack design, securing the cells into their larger battery modules or trays, takes different dispensing approaches.

Cylindrical Battery Cells

Methods:

  • Flood: Filling each individual cell with enough material to cover the entire floor of the cell provides the best bonding surface, but consumes the most material.
  • Strategic Dots: Small 0.1 to 0.2 cc dots in patterns of 2-4, that create enough bond strength to hold the cell in place, uses the least amount of material, but generally requires more application time.
  • Bead around internal circumference: A bead is strategically placed around the internal diameter of the cell housing.

Common Materials Dispensed:

  • Single component epoxies
  • Two component curing epoxies
  • Single component UV curing materials

Common Challenges:

  • Production Speed – When dispensing beads or dots in small spaces, such as a battery cell housing, a needle or nozzle is used that requires very accurate robot movement, that can lead to lengthening of cycle time.
  • Nordson Solution: Multiple dispense heads per dispensing meter can allow for more cells to be complete before the need to move the robot dispensing arm location
  • Location Accuracy – moving quickly from place to place can result in beads or dots slightly off from the desired location, or beads left incomplete.
  • Nordson Solution: our material and application knowledge, coupled with our robotic automation experience, enable us to design engineered solutions that provide the correct number of dispense heads at the flow rate and robotic speed the application needs.

Square Battery Cells

Methods:

  • Beading: Beads are placed on each square battery cell. Once placed in the battery pack, the beads are compressed and create a larger bonding surface. Uses less material, but requires more robotic control.
  • Encapsulation: Cells are placed into a battery pack, and then material is dispensed or injected to completely surround the cells with the sealant material. Uses a large volume of material, but provides the highest confidence of insulation, with limited robotic requirements.

Common Materials Dispensed:

  • Two component curing epoxies

Common Challenges:

  • Air entrapment – Air can become trapped around the battery cells curing an encapsulation fill or pour.
  • Nordson Solution: Programmable dispense speeds allow for mid-shot adjustments in material flow rate, which allows air to escape from the fill. Speed can be adjusted back to full speed once the material is past the point of concern, which allows production speed to be achieved.